The Abomination of Desolation?

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Should Jews succeed in getting their temple built, then perhaps, rather than “the Holy Land,” we might more appropriately begin referring to it as the un-Holy Land.

By Richard Edmondson

Late last month a debate took place in the Israeli Knesset regarding the status of the Temple Mount, or the Haram al-Sharif, as it’s referred to in Arabic.

“When we run from the Mount we lose the legitimacy to our presence in Tel Aviv,” said Likud Knesset Member Moshe Feiglin. “The Temple Mount is like the heart in the organs. Whoever rules the Mount rules the country.”

Feiglin’s remarks are quoted by Arutz Sheva, in an article that refers to the discussion on the matter as “an historic Knesset debate on the issue of freedom of religion and Israeli sovereignty on the Temple Mount, Judaism’s holiest site.”

The debate was indeed “historic,” but the author of the piece fails to mention why (maybe it simply slipped his mind). The issue was raised in the Knesset on February 25—the twentieth anniversary of the Hebron massacre, in which a Jewish settler entered the Ibrihimi Mosque and opened fire, killing 29 worshippers and wounding an additional 125. The massacre was carried out by Baruch Goldstein, who today in Israel is widely regarded as a hero.

The timing of the debate would not have been a coincidence, something remarked upon by Palestinian writer Ramzy Baroud.

The Israeli Knesset (Parliament) chose the 20th anniversary of the Goldstein massacre of Palestinians in al-Khalil, to begin a debate concerning the status of al-Aqsa compound. Right-wingers – which constitute the bulk in the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu – want the Israeli government to enforce its “sovereignty” over the Muslim site, which is administered by Jordan per the Jordanian-Israeli peace treaty of 1994. Israeli MP Moshe Feiglin, is the man behind the move, but he is not alone.

Indeed he is not. Within Israel is a prominent organization called The Temple Institute, whose goal is to build the “Third Temple” on the site now occupied by the Dome of the Rock and to revive the ancient practice of animal sacrifice. There is also an organization called the Temple Mount Heritage Foundation whose objectives seem to be much the same, and whose former executive director is Rabbi Yehuda Glick.

 photo yglick_zps21fa773f.jpg

Yehuda Glick

Israeli authorities had formerly banned Glick from entering the Temple Mount due to concerns over security and the possibility of an outbreak of violence, but in December of last year the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court ordered Israeli police to pay the rabble-rousing rabbi 30,000 Israeli shekels as compensation for two previous arrests deemed to have been “wrongful.” And on March 2, five days after the “historic” Knesset debate, Glick, accompanied by a number of other Jewish extremists, returned to the sacred site where their presence, not surprisingly, touched off an uproar. And rather than being prevented from entering, they were, on this occasion, escorted by police.

“Expectedly, Palestinian worshipers stood defiant, shouting Allahu Akbar (God is Great),” says Baroud. “Considering the debate in the Knesset, and the increasing joint provocations involving Israeli police and extremists, there is little doubt that the Israeli government has something sinister in mind.”

Glick today heads an organization known as the LIBA Project for Jewish Ascent to the Temple Mount, and last month he published an “open letter” to Israeli police serving at the site, calling upon them to remember that “this place is what all Jews throughout history aspired to.”

He went on to add, “There are many people who are not happy (to say the least) about the fact that the Jewish nation has returned to its home, and that the Israelites are fulfilling Biblical prophecy.”

Glick and his fellow religious Jews—and their Christian Zionist devotees—may be right: “biblical prophecy” may be in the process of becoming fulfilled here, though just not in the way they think.

“So when you see standing in the holy place the abomination that causes desolation, spoken of through the prophet Daniel—let the reader understand—then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains.”

So said Jesus in Matthew 24:14. It is abundantly clear, or should be by now, that the Ashkenazi Jews, whose origins trace back to the Volga River region of southern Russia and who sometimes today are referred to as “Khazars,” are not the descendants of the “Israelites” of the Bible. If there is anyone today who could plausibly trace their lineage back to the earliest followers of Jesus it would be the Palestinians.

Christian Zionists today who have given their unconditional support to Israel and its ruthless apartheid policies—policies quite likely directed against the very heirs and assigns the Christian Zionists purport to be favoring with their “blessings”—are suffering from a “powerful delusion” and are making a huge, huge mistake.

For a good long while now reports have emerged about excavations beneath the Temple Mount carried out by Israeli authorities, presumably in an effort to uncover archaeological evidence of previous Jewish temples, though some have speculated that the real intent is to cause structural damage to the Dome of the Rock, making its collapse basically a fait accompli.

Such a scheme, if one indeed exists and is successfully executed, would amount to desecration of a holy site. Curiously, Arutz Sheva does indeed inform its readers that “Temple Mount desecration” is occurring, but the spin given the story is that the desecrating is being done by the other side:

The public needs to know the truth about antiquities on the Temple Mount, according to one official involved in the Jewish site’s preservation.

Attorney Yisrael Kaspi, a member of the Committee to Prevent Temple Mount Desecration, stated to Arutz Sheva Saturday night that the full report regarding the Waqf’s desecration of antiquities on the Mount needs to be revealed to the public.

Go here and you’ll see that the “desecration” referred to consists of the moving of a pile of dirt by the Waqf, the Jordanian-connected trust which administers the Temple Mount, without having gotten prior approval from the Israel Antiquities Authority, and also the Waqf’s failure to put plastic around some exposed beams, believed to date to the first temple era, so as to protect them from the weather. These oversights were alluded to in the “historic Knesset debate” that took place on February 25.

“If you will go up with me to the Mount, I’ll show you how the remnants of Solomon’s Temple and the Temple of the Jews who returned from Babylon are wallowing in ashes,” said Feiglin that evening.

Perhaps it’s not surprising, then, that not long after the great debate of February 25 was over, renewed excavations began underneath the Temple Mount, a matter noted by Baroud:

On the next day following the Israeli debate on the annexation of al-Aqsa, a thundering sound was heard around 3am in the Wadi Hilweh neighbourhood of Silwan, located south of the Old City of Jerusalem. Ma’an news agency reported that the residents of the neighbourhood heard the “sounds of heavy duty machines digging under their houses throughout the night”. Then, a large wall suddenly collapsed, while few houses sustained damage.

Strangely, no one seemed surprised, as Israeli machines have been digging underneath the Old City and al-Aqsa compound for a long time searching for any evidence of a temple that dates back several millennia. The underground network of tunnels is growing, as some of these tunnels connect Wadi Hilweh to the Western Wall to al-Aqsa.

To be fair, some Jews are saying the goal is not to destroy the Dome of the Rock or Al Aqsa mosque, but merely to secure equal rights for Jews to go up on the Temple Mount to pray. This is the position taken by Knesset member Miri Regev, who calls for an arrangement by which “everyone in the state of Israel will be able to go up and pray at their holy place,” with Jews and Muslims being assigned rotating days.

How many synagogues open their doors for Muslims to come in and pray on alternating days? Maybe some do, I don’t know, but the dispute over the Temple Mount clearly has the potential of reaching a flash point of some sort.

With tensions between Russia and the US escalating over Ukraine, much of the world’s gaze is focused now on that region of the earth. Yet it would behoove us to keep our eyes on Occupied Palestine. As I have said before (here, here and here ) Jewish power, and particularly Jewish neocons, have been the driving force behind the chaotic developments in Ukraine, and with the major powers poised on such a dangerous precipice, and with a “destabilizing force” seemingly threatening planetary cohesion and international balance in a manner not seen in a while, connections like this are worth paying attention to.

Another reason to keep our eyes on Palestine is the approaching Jewish holiday of Purim, traditionally a time of violence and upheaval in that part of the world. I am posting this article on March 8. The Purim holiday, which celebrates the massacre of Gentiles as related in the Old Testament book of Esther, is exactly one week away.

In recent years, Purim has coincided with a number of bloody incidents. In fact, the massacre carried out by Baruch Goldstein twenty years ago occurred on Purim, and according to one analyst, “by mowing down Arabs he believed wanted to kill Jews, Goldstein was reenacting part of the Purim story.”

According to Silwanic.net, a website that monitors events in the Palestinian neighborhoods immediately surrounding the Temple Mount, 170 people, including 75 juveniles, were arrested in the first two months of this year, most in connection with disturbances prompted by Jews paying visits to the holy site.

“Among the detainees were also five women, a girl, and a young woman,” says the report. “They were all arrested near Al-Aqsa Gates while trying to go through, and they are: Um Tarek Hashlamon, Hiba Tawil, Njood Mteir, Samira Idris and Suha Eid. The girl, Dima Qunbar, from the neighbourhood of Jabal Al-Mukabber was arrested under the pretext of stabbing an Israeli soldier and the young woman, Haneen Abu Hummus, was arrested during violent clashes in the village of Esawyeh.”

According to the report, during the same time period—January and February of this year—ten homes were also demolished. Meanwhile Israel continues to maintain its blockade of Gaza, violate Lebanese airspace, launch sporadic attacks upon Syria, while its lobby in America works to bring about a war with Iran.

Should Jews succeed in getting their temple built, then perhaps, rather than “the Holy Land,” we might more appropriately begin referring to it as the un-Holy Land.

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One Response to The Abomination of Desolation?

  1. davideves says:

    It’s been a few years ago now that I saw one of these fellows from the Temple Institute on Benny Hinn’s “This is Your Day” show.They were raising money for the new temple to fulfill Gods’ plan.
    I couldn’t help but think wow-Christians giving money to those who think God wants more animal sacrifices,and the same Christians believe an antiChrist will declare himself God in this temple.
    But surely Benny who has coffee with Jesus every morning must have got the ok from Him to do this.

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