Sight or Blindness: Which Do We Choose?

By Richard Edmondson

One of the most beloved of Christian hymns is the song “Amazing Grace.” It combines a beautiful melody with an uplifting message (that we can be forgiven for our sins is nothing short of “amazing”) and offers up two of the most famous and memorable lines ever written: “I once was lost but now am found/was blind but now I see.”

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Hugo Chavez and the Pharisees

This post is intended as a companion piece to my article, Destabilizing Venezuela: Exploring the Zionist Connection. In that article I offered the following observation regarding former Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez:

There are some admirable leaders on the world stage today. By and large they are the same ones most heavily demonized by the mainstream media. But for standing up and speaking truth to power, Chavez was in a class by himself.

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Coming up in Northern California: Screenings of the Documentary ‘Open Bethlehem’

“Open Bethlehem” is a documentary by Palestinian filmmaker Leila Sansour, who was born in the town of Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus. The town, as the film shows, is now surrounded by Israel’s apartheid wall. Screenings of the film are presently being held in Northern California.

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Blessed Are the Peacemakers

[ Ed. note – The video above is of a townhall meeting conducted last week by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard in her home state of Hawaii. If you want to hear the congresswoman discuss the situation in Syria, fast forward the video to about 10 minutes in. Gabbard, who introduced the Stop Arming Terrorists act in Congress and who has drawn fire for challenging the media lies about Syria (most recently for questioning the narrative that the Assad government was behind the April 4 chemical weapons attack), is one of a number of a small number of prominent Americans who have been a voice of sanity in a world seemingly gone mad and moving closer and closer to war.

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The Legend of Jesus and Mary Magdalene

By Richard Edmondson

Out of the four gospels, it is the Gospel of John’s portrayal of the resurrection that has probably most captured the human imagination, mainly for its depiction of the encounter outside the tomb between Jesus and Mary Magdalene. Hinting at a strong emotional bond between the two, the scene is—in a word—titillating.

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A Jewish Banker

Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus lived, whom Jesus had raised from the dead. Here a dinner was given in Jesus’ honor. Martha served, while Lazarus was among those reclining at the table with him. Then Mary took about a pint of pure nard, an expensive perfume; she poured it on Jesus’ feet and wiped his feet with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.

But one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, who was later to betray him,objected,  “Why wasn’t this perfume sold and the money given to the poor? It was worth a year’s wages.” He did not say this because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was put into it.

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Easter and the Legend of the Dogwood Tree

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[ Ed. note – The Easter season is upon us. As we pause and reflect on the events of that week of 2000 years ago I thought it would be worthwhile to put up an article I first posted back in 2014. ]

The dogwood tree explodes into riotous bloom each year on Easter Week. Strangely, this remains true, year after year, regardless whether Easter falls in March or April–it is always, always Easter week that the dogwood petals reach their maximum opulence.

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